The Rod of Power and the Magical Battle of Britain

Merlin Sitting Rod

I would like to add the Rod (also called a staff or scepter), which symbolizes the knowledge that directs invisible spiritual forces applied to governance, to the Arthurian symbolism of the sword and scabbard (the Cup or Grail Cup).  The Rod of Power and its use belongs to the Arthurian Magus, Merlin, who wields it by means of a trained mind in esoteric spiritual knowledge.  In short, the Rod of Power represents “…Secret Wisdom employed to guide the affairs of nations” (Fortune, 1993, p. 43).  Dion Fortune writes specifically about its use in her letters (seventeen to twenty-two) to other initiates and adepts during World War II contained in The Magical Battle of Britain (edited by Gareth Knight).   “…and the Cup and the Sword and Sceptre make a wonderful symbol of balanced and functional force” (Fortune, 1993, p. 36).

This triune of symbols, or triple-rayed triangle referred to by Fortune, brings to mind the three-legged stool upon which balance is achieved.  Fortune describes the thought form of the triple-rayed triangle as consisting of three definite rays (red for Sword, blue for Scabbard/Cup and purple for Rod/Sceptre) forming the three angles of a triangle through which the white light of Spirit poured.  This symbol was built up on the Inner Plane and evoked in 1940 during WWII by the members of the Society of Inner Light trained in occult methods of meditation.  The triple-rayed triangle not only represents spiritual forces expressing inner realities but mythical archetypal forces by which national identities are formed, fed and preserved.

Tree of Life

For those of you versed in the Qabalistic correspondences, Fortune assigns the Sword and Red Ray of the destructive dynamic of Mars to the Sephirah Geburah on the Pillar of Severity and the Rod of Power and the Blue Ray of organizing civilizing forces of Jupiter to the Sephirah Chesed on the Pillar of Mercy.  The Scabbard/Cup of the Purple Ray is assigned to the Christ Center of the Tree, the Sephirah Tiphareth, where forces are brought into equilibrium.  The sword is the dynamic force that destroys evil and also the Sword of Chivalry and protection; the Scabbard/Cup is the receptacle of spiritual influences, the container of force and its potentiality; and the Rod of Power rules and directs Invisible Forces from Inner Planes of existence into the material world.  Continue reading “The Rod of Power and the Magical Battle of Britain”

Building a Bridge Between Human and Faerie: The Purpose of the Marriage of King Arthur and Queen Gwenevere?

 

Queen Gwenevere, the Faerie Bride
Queen Gwenevere, the Faerie Bride

Is it true?  Was Queen Gwenevere Faerie?  Was her marriage to King Arthur more than a marriage to unite the divided territories of Great Britain around the Roundtable and ensure future progeny?  What was Merlin’s grand design to bring about the conception of Arthur by magical workings of visionary forces and then foster him out to an ordinary common folk family until he was ready for his kingship to commence?  Why did Merlin play an integral role at the dawn of Arthur’s kingship only to see him lose direction and fade away dying an ignominious death at the hands of his bastard son, Mordred?  What failed to be achieved that did not play out on the grand stage that once was Camelot?

The Faerie Queen
The Faerie Queen

Gwenevere appears as a rather lack luster figure in Arthurian legend, neither powerful, having the authority of a Queen or any linkage to a historically recorded figure.  In addition, she did not come into the marriage from among the various families of nobility as a political power alliance with a well-endowed dowry of land.  Her ancestry also seems tenuous at best and of little help to Arthur who unlike other royalty did not inherit his throne but had to fight for it.  Queen Gwenevere is chiefly known for her affair with her husband’s best knight and friend, Lancelot.  Also notable is her childlessness and the constant attempted abductions involving her retrieval back to Camelot by various knights and King Arthur himself.  So what gives? Continue reading “Building a Bridge Between Human and Faerie: The Purpose of the Marriage of King Arthur and Queen Gwenevere?”